C++ Header File

The C++ header requires several properties and methods that must be overridden from the base class:

Note

Use only ASCII characters for file include path, C++ class name, and variables.

Install Third-Party Libraries

If you have third-party Arduino® libraries for your Arduino hardware that you will use with your add-on, install it at the following locations:

  • Windows® and Linux® - "arduinoio.IDERoot/portable/sketchbook/libraries/"

  • Mac- "~/Documents/Arduino/libraries/"

LibraryBase

The LibraryBase class provides all the necessary functionality for executing the code from the #bu7z4iu. At the beginning of the file C++ header file, you must include the LibraryBase.h library:

#include "LibraryBase.h" 

You can include additional libraries following LibraryBase.h. Typically, these libraries are third-party Arduino libraries for your Arduino hardware that provide direct access to specific functionality.

Your base add-on class C++ header must extend the LibraryBase class:

class MyAddon : public LibraryBase {
    ...
};

Note

If you have included additional third-party libraries, make sure the name of your add-on class (e.g. MyAddon) is not the same as the name of any of the classes defined in the third-party libraries.

Extending the LibraryBase.h class provides access to the appropriate methods and properties. The following diagram shows the typical method inheritance for an add-on:

Constructor

The add-on constructor defines the name of your add-on library and registers the library with the main Arduino program. Your add-on class must override the default constructor method of the LibraryBase. The constructor uses the same name as your add-on class and takes a reference to a MWArduinoClass object.

public:
   MyAddon(MWArduinoClass& a)
   {
 	
      libName = "MyAddonPackageFolder/MyAddon";
      	
      a.registerLibrary(this);
   }

The library name property, libName, must be the same string defined in the Library Specification of the MATLAB Add-On Class:

<AddonFolderName>/<AddonName>

The add-on library is registered with the general MWArduinoClass object using the registerLibrary method. For example, the constructor from the Create HelloWorld Add-On example uses the following constructor:

public:
        HelloWorld(MWArduinoClass& a)
        {            
            libName = "ExampleAddon/HelloWorld";            
            a.registerLibrary(this);
        }

Command Handler

The commandHandler method is the entry point for the commands executed in your MATLAB Add-On Class that were executed by the sendCommand. Your add-on class must override the default commandHandler method of the LibraryBase class.

public:
   void commandHandler(byte cmdID, byte* dataIn, unsigned int payloadSize)
   {            
   
      switch (cmdID){
               
         case 0x01:{  
            …                    
            sendResponseMsg(cmdID, val, 13);
            break;
         }

	  … // Other cases with appropriate cmdIDs  

         default:{
            // Do nothing
         }
      }
   }

The switch statement uses the command identifiers, cmdID, to determine the segment of code to execute. The cmdIDs must match those defined in the MATLAB Add-On Class. At the end of each switch statement, the commandHandler must call the sendResponseMsg function:

sendResponseMsg(byte commandID, byte* dataOut, unsigned int payloadSize)

The data assigned to the input arguments dataOut, and payloadSize returned to the output arguments of the sendCommand function.

Note

Execution of thesendCommand called within the MATLAB Add-On Class held until either a sendResponseMsg executes or the timeout condition is reached.

The commandHandler method from the Create HelloWorld Add-On example shows how a string, 'Hello World!', can be created in the C++ code and returned to the MATLAB Add-On Class through the commandHandler:

public:
        void commandHandler(byte cmdID, byte* dataIn, unsigned int payloadSize)
        {      
            switch (cmdID){
                
                case 0x01:{  
                    byte val [13] = "Hello World!";
                    sendResponseMsg(cmdID, val, 13);
                    break;
                }

                default:{
                    // Do nothing
                }
            }
}

Setup

The setup method can be used to initialize and set the initial values. Your add-on class can override the default setup method of the LibraryBase class to initialize variables. The Create LCD Add-on example overrides the default setup method to reset the cursor to the first row upon initialization as shown:

public:
	void setup()
	{
		cursorRow=0;

	}

Loop

The loop method can be used to perform certain repetitive tasks. Your add-on class can override the default loop method of the LibraryBase class. In the example below, if mcused is true, the controller remains on.

	void loop()
         {
          if(mcused)
          {
               controllerMW.ping();
          }
         }

Note

Do not use any blocking operation in the loop method.

Debugging

The LibraryBase also provides a convenient function, debugPrint, to display messages to the MATLAB® command line to help in development of your add-on.

The debugPrint function uses the same syntax as the C++ printf function:

debugPrint(MSG_EXAMPLE_DEBUG);

The debug message must be declared in the C++ header file using the following syntax:

const char MSG_EXAMPLE_DEBUG[]     PROGMEM = "This is a debug message.\n";

where the string PROGMEM is the message displayed. Additional information can be included in the debug message using format specifiers. To enable debugPrint messages to be displayed to the MATLAB command line during run-time, you must set the additional Name-Value property ‘trace’ in the arduino function:

The Create HelloWorld Add-On example prints to the MATLAB command line a sample debug message with the last commandID that was included using a format specifier:

const char MSG_EXAMPLE_DEBUG[]  PROGMEM = "Example debug message: cmdID %d\n";

...

debugPrint(MSG_EXAMPLE_DEBUG, cmdID);

See Also

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